Tag Archives: students

Talents of UVI: The Charles “Pollo” Goodings Interview

 

Featured Image: Charles “Pollo” Goodings (Photo Courtesy of Horace Matthews)

Nikiyah Gerson |

ST. CROIX – The University of the Virgin Islands has students with a broad range of talents. Some who use these very talents everyday and in ways that directly impact the students of the university such as Charles Goodings, Jr., a.k.a. “Pollo.”

Pollo is a radio show host for WUVI on the St. Croix Campus, airing on 97.3 FMLP and 1090 AM, every Wednesday from 1:00-3:00 p.m.

“I enjoy bringing entertainment and enjoyment to others through the university radio station,” expressed Pollo.

Before going on air, Pollo goes through his usual ritual, such as making sure his equipment is set up, playlist is ready and posting announcements on his social media informing people to tune in.

He has recently begun going “Live” on Facebook which allows people to actually see him in the studio while he is on air, thus appealing to a bigger audience.
“Being a radio show host for the school is a fun experience because I get to do what I love,” said Pollo.

Pollo is a junior on the Albert A. Sheen Campus on St. Croix. He is a full-time student obtaining a degree in mass communication and mass media.

The many hats Pollo wears include: DJ, radio show host, engineer, songwriter/musician, activity coordinator, president of Team M.A.D. (Making A Difference), a non-profit organization, and owner of his own clothing line, Apollo Legion, LLC.

The everyday life of Pollo revolves around the things he loves doing best such as entertainment and expanding his clothing line.

One could see Pollo on campus five days a week juggling a full-time class schedule, maintaining his business and giving back to UVI.

Remember it’s important to support our own. Make sure to tune into 97.3 FMLP and 1090 AM to listen to Pollo or watch him live on Facebook every Wednesday from 1:00-3:00 p.m.

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Psychology Club Beach Cleanup

Featured Photo: Albert A. Sheen Campus Psychology Club

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UVI Psychology Club members placing litter into a trash bag.

ST. CROIX – In partnership with Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup and other organizations around the globe, the University of the Virgin Islands Psychology Club held its first Beach Cleanup for the semester. Officers, students and community volunteers gathered at Rainbow Beach, St. Croix on Saturday September 17th, 2016 to remove trash from waterways and to identify the sources of debris. In a collective effort to take action to ensure trash never reaches our beaches.

All photos are courtesy of Leanne E. Morancie, UVI Psychology Club Public Relations Officer.

 

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Club members discussing their plan for the cleanup.

Officers In Featured Photo:
Advisor: Dr. Aletha Baumann
Public Relations Officer: Leanne E. Morancie
Treasurer: Jama Raimer
Events Coordinator: Jailine Manon

For more information or to join the Psychology Club, please email Leanne E. Morancie at lmorancie10@gmail.com.

It’s Volleyball Season at UVI

It’s Volleyball Season at UVI

Denae Fleming|

ST.CROIX – Students at the University of the Virgin Islands took part in the co-ed intramurals volleyball game Monday night behind the campus cafeteria just south of the campus dorms.

Student Teams Taking part in the Intramural Volleyball League
Student Teams Taking part in the Intramural Volleyball League

The university’s intramurals volleyball league played for the second time Monday night around 9 p.m. on the basketball court with teams “Stop Playing” against “We Would Hit It.”

The volleyball season officially kicked off last week on Thursday night and usually starts each year in September.

“Coach Bruce Ray has been doing most of the intramurals as far as putting the sport together and organizing the schedule here at the university and this year we started early,” Roderick Moorehead Jr. one of the coaches for the volleyball teams, said.

While enjoying the game with the rest of the audience Moorehead also said, “One of the main purposes for this weekly activity is to inspire campus life. It’s always great when you have students who have the interest to play.”

The league plays every Monday and Thursday at 9 p.m. with a second game following immediately after.

“If you want to take part in the sport you have to be somewhat serious. You can come and just play for fun but there should be a level serious interest in joining the teams,” Makeem Perinon said.

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Student Teams Taking part in the Intramural Volleyball League

Perinon is a part of the Virgin Islands Juniors National Volleyball team and is also a sophomore studying criminal justice. He heard about the student activity at the University and became immediately interested. He decided to take part and started his own team called Go Hard for the intramural league.

The game is free to the public. It gives students on campus an opportunity to leave the dorms and enjoy a moment of interaction with other students on and off court.

Where are all the Men?

Where are all the Men?

CHRIS SEALEY|

ST. CROIX –Finding a male student at the University of the Virgin Islands is equivalent to finding an Eskimo in the Caribbean. At the university, 31 percent of freshmen are male and 29 percent of all undergraduate students are male. The typical undergraduate student at UVI is a mature local woman attending full time.

creg brown, part of the 28 percent of 2013 UVI male graduates
Creg Brown, one of the 29 percent of 2013 UVI male graduates

But why is this happening? Are young women simply more ambitious and harder-working? Are men becoming increasingly disengaged from academia?

Female high-school students are more likely to aspire to attend college than their male counterparts and the young women enrolled in college, persist and graduate at higher rates as well, according to a report released on Aug. 28, 2012 by the National Center for Education Statistics.

When young women graduate from high school they tend to go straight into college with a plan set on a four-year degree.

Men decide to go college at a lower rate. For example, while almost three-quarters of female students who enrolled in college did so immediately after high school, just over two-thirds of male students did. Slightly less than half of young men first enrolled in a college or university.

In high school women paid more attention to the college searches than men. They would consult college websites, publications or search guides for information on college entrance requirements. Only 60 percent of male seniors reached out to college representatives for information.

Once in college, a higher percentage of women  stay enrolled and graduate, according to the statistics taken by BYU in 2004. Roughly 60 percent of all first-time, full-time bachelor-degree-seeking students who started college in 2004 had earned an degree six years later from the same institution. A greater proportion of women finished than men.

When asked about her take on the ratio of female students to male students, third-year student Nicole Foster said, “It’s not that there are more males than females on the islands it’s just that more women decided to come school than men.”

The purpose of higher education is to be more qualified for higher paying jobs.

Women don’t typically go for jobs in construction or security, which don’t necessarily require a degree. So women try to get the edge with a degree.

Kappa Gamma’s Freestyle Fridays a success

Kappa Gamma’s Freestyle Fridays a success

Felicia Emmanuel|

ST. CROIX- University of the Virgin Islands students on Sept. 20 gathered around the Student Activities center to watch fellow students exhibit their freestyling talents during Freestyle Friday.

Freestyle rap is a spontaneous performance done without preparation.

Emulating BET’s 106 & Park segment, Freestyle Fridays allow UVI students to exhibit their rapping creativity, while allowing their peers to vote on the best performance. The winner would then defend his or her title at the next Freestyle Friday.

“The purpose of Freestyle Friday is to bring life and spirit to campus,” said Sheena Tonge, vice president of Kappa Gamma.

“We usually have a rap battle,” Tonge said. However, lack of contestants led to a decision not to have a match.

 Junior "Judah VI" and others participants look on as rapper drops his verse
Junior “Judah VI” and others participants look on as rapper drops his verse

Despite having no contest, students still showed their support.

This was especially encouraging to part-time UVI student and DJ Charles “Daddy Pollo” Goodings Jr. Goodings, 22, believes support from his peers helped make the occasion successful.

“I surprised myself,” Goodings said. “I really didn’t expect to see so many people come out. Just the fact that I’m playing, people came out to support.”

He has been a DJ at other Kappa Gamma events such as on-campus basketball games and Dancehall Cardio.

“Kappa Gamma supports students doing big things,” Tonge said.

In terms of participation, Kappa Gamma President Junior “Judah VI” Garcia was no exception.

Garcia dropped some verses to Nicki Minaj’s “Beez in the Trap.”

The occasion ended on a festive note as friends of Khalid Edwards held a surprise birthday celebration in his honor.

Overall, students such as Remah Asad were pleased with the outcome. She felt it brought the students together as one.

“The music and allowing everyone to be themselves in an environment that is not strictly professional is always fun and good,” she said. “It’s like an appreciation event towards the students.”

Students unfamiliar with Kappa Gamma should know it is a marketing and management group.

“Clubs and organizations on campus would plan events and the events would not turn out the way they would want to in terms of publicizing the event. Therefore, Kappa Gamma was put in place to help with the media,”  Tonge said.

Students look on to support peers as they participate at freestyle friday
Students look on to support peers as they participate at freestyle friday

By using sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, Kappa Gamma utilizes them all to the host club’s or organization’s advantage.

Their involvement, however, does not end with promotional work. Kappa Gamma secures volunteers to help with clean up.

Students interested in Kappa Gamma events can reach out to them.

“We always have flyers up,” Tonge said. “We have a [Facebook] page you can contact Mr. Garcia or you can contact myself.”

Students can also go to Mrs. Hedda Finch-Simpson’s office in the Student Activities Center for more information about the club.

Tonge added that interested students can speak with Kappa Gamma members at their events.

Once there, the organization can acquire contact information.