Tag Archives: beach clean up

Psychology Club Beach Cleanup

Featured Photo: Albert A. Sheen Campus Psychology Club

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UVI Psychology Club members placing litter into a trash bag.

ST. CROIX – In partnership with Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup and other organizations around the globe, the University of the Virgin Islands Psychology Club held its first Beach Cleanup for the semester. Officers, students and community volunteers gathered at Rainbow Beach, St. Croix on Saturday September 17th, 2016 to remove trash from waterways and to identify the sources of debris. In a collective effort to take action to ensure trash never reaches our beaches.

All photos are courtesy of Leanne E. Morancie, UVI Psychology Club Public Relations Officer.

 

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Club members discussing their plan for the cleanup.

Officers In Featured Photo:
Advisor: Dr. Aletha Baumann
Public Relations Officer: Leanne E. Morancie
Treasurer: Jama Raimer
Events Coordinator: Jailine Manon

For more information or to join the Psychology Club, please email Leanne E. Morancie at lmorancie10@gmail.com.

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UVI Science Dept. partners with St. Thomas Historical Trust for Hassel Island Beach Cleanup

DAVID B. GUMBS |

ST. THOMAS – Thanks to a mutually beneficial partnership between the University of the Virgin Islands and the St. Thomas Historical Trust, students and teachers from the University’s Science 100 classes were ferried over to Hassel Island on January 31, where they participated in a beach cleanup and beautification event.

Students and Science 100 professors participate in a beach cleanup on Hassel Island on January 31. Photo Credit: David Gumbs
Students and Science 100 Professors participate in a beach cleanup on Hassel Island on January 31.
Photo Credit: David Gumbs

After meeting at the staging area outside of the Hook Line & Sinker restaurant in Frenchtown, the volunteers were divided into three groups and sent over to Hassel Island, with each group being assigned to a different beachhead.

Once on island, each group received a brief but educational tour of the surrounding landmarks and historical sites before spreading out and beginning the cleanup itself.

The resulting experience, which covered a great deal of the island’s shores and nature trails, was a success in helping to preserve both the natural beauty of the local environment and the fragile existence of important historical areas.

It also served as an example to an important topic of discussion: just what impact does the environment have on the University?

“It’s huge,” Amber McCammon, a Science 100 professor on the St. Thomas campus said. “Lots of people come here just for the marine biology program… [but] it’s imperative that we maintain [a balance] for health and tourism reasons also; everything’s connected.”

For the student body, the environment was also a concern as respective Business and Communication students Rachel van Beverhaudt and Asyshah Smith shared.

“[I feel] the environment is in a dangerous position,” van Beverhaudt said. Smith added, “[UVI] needs to maintain it, and it needs to be taken seriously.”

The University seems to approach the topic with dedication since it not only sponsors events such as beach and campus cleanups, but it also raises awareness of the local environment through small natural exhibits that showcase the local ecosystem and flora.

Photo Credit: David Gumbs
Once on island, each group received a brief but educational tour of the surrounding landmarks and historical sites before spreading out and beginning the cleanup itself. Photo Credit: David Gumbs

But can UVI do more? Professor McCammon believes so.

“Events like the beach cleanup on Hassel Island are a solid start, but more can be done,” she said. McCammon stressed that the inclusion of more of the various majors would create a broader range of appeal, which is key for future involvement.

With the environment being such a major part of Virgin Islands identity and income, UVI should be well aware of the consequences of its help, or lack thereof.